Forgive Me, Mother Nature

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[My sister told me about creepypasta, and I wanted to try my hand at one. It’s a very short work of paranormal or horror fiction. The concept came from my son; the writing from me. Disclaimer: This may suck.]

creepy-pasta

[by Susan Ashline]

As told by my 12-year-old son:

Last spring, we found a baby deer with spots in our yard. They told us the mother would come get her at night after looking for food all day. So we watched over her to make sure she was safe.

My mom has a picture of a whole crap ton of deer standing like mannequins on our property, staring at her, and their eyes are totally glowing. I love the red fox that run through our back yard, and the wild turkeys look funny when they cross the street like soldiers in formation. I’m even cool with the coyotes as long as they stay away from our rabbits.

We get snakes, too. There’s a mom snake that lives in our garden, and we always see a mass of baby snakes that look like a bowl of spaghetti every year around the time the birds come back.

The birds – the turkey hawks are the only ones I don’t like. They hover around our rabbits, plotting and waiting for an opportunity.

Across the street, they put up “for sale” signs by a company that builds houses. They build whole neighborhoods. And they were building one right across the street. But it wasn’t their place to build. It made me angry.

I couldn’t stand to hear the machines. They sounded like big machines, loud. Every time I heard them, I wished horrible things; things I wouldn’t tell anyone. I just wanted them to go away. I wanted them to stop. Every time I heard them, it meant more trees were coming down; fewer places deer could hide and find food.

It used to be all woods. It belonged to nature.

I would sneak onto the property and hide in the bushes and watch the dozers and bucket trucks and trucks I couldn’t name. One was taking down trees; another was chewing them up and spitting them out. Every sound meant one more tree was gone.

It pissed me off. But really, it made me sad.

My mom made me a Halloween costume. I wanted a ghillie suit, so she got some burlap and plastic leaves, and then sewed on the leaves, and we tied the ends. It fit kind of like a sack.

I kept it so I could sneak across the street and spy on the workers. I’d just sit and make like a bush.

I learned the names of the men working over there. I’d hear them call to each other, joking, like they didn’t care that they were destroying nature. Like it was theirs to take.

Vance was a big guy, but he wasn’t very old. He had red hair and a red beard, and his laugh was as big as he was; kind of like Santa Clause, but without the white hair, lot less chubby and a hundred years younger. I think he was in college. He kept talking about this girl he liked, named Phoebe, I think. It was hard to hear over the machines.

There were three guys: Vance, Seth and Campbell.

But, so, one day, I heard this guy, Seth, telling Vance that he would score big with Phoebe if he killed this buck and paid to have it mounted to give to her. He was acting like he’d be some big champion.

And then, I couldn’t believe my eyes when Seth pointed to a huge deer with these gigantic antlers. It was standing, watching them, and its eyes were glowing.

It wasn’t funny. I couldn’t believe they were even joking about killing it. I was so upset, I left.

I told my mom, and she told me to stop going over there. She didn’t want me to get in trouble for going on someone else’s property. She didn’t like what they were doing. She hated it as much as I did. But she didn’t want me to go any more.

I couldn’t stop myself.

I went over again. This time, Seth was shooting off his mouth about what a skilled hunter he is, supposedly. He was young, too, but I’m sure he wasn’t in college. He looked like a redneck. Hair went all around his face, but not like a normal beard. And his hair was cut really bad, like someone put a bowl on his head and cut around it; like it was his girlfriend’s first time with the scissors. But I don’t even think he would have a girlfriend, because he was ugly. And his teeth were brown and all messed up. And he always wore a baseball hat with camouflage on it, and shirts with patches.

Campbell was quiet. I think he was in charge. He was old. He probably had a whole family. He wore a hat, too, but underneath it, his hair stuck out, a lot of gray mixed in with a little black.

So, anyway, I was sitting on the ground in the ghillie suit, watching Seth and Vance eating lunch. Campbell was off somewhere. His truck was gone. That big buck came out of nowhere. I just saw it standing in front of them, like, half-way from me to them, maybe only as far away as our driveway is long. And they froze a minute and looked like they weren’t sure what to do. Then, all of sudden, Seth whispered something to Vance, both of them burst out laughing, and – Vance charged the deer!

I was really horrified. I wanted to run. I was afraid the deer would come my way and trample me, because no one could tell I wasn’t ground cover. I couldn’t catch my breath, I was so scared.

But the deer ran off just to the left of me, and Vance went after it.

He stopped; looked around. He stood there. The deer was gone. And Vance looked like he didn’t know which direction to go, so he kind of stumbled back into a tree and then rested against it.

I don’t know if I can tell this part. I want to cry. I should’ve listened to my mom. I shouldn’t have gone back there.

The tree – it… it came alive. I swear. The branches had no leaves, and like arms, I swear they wrapped around Vance – his whole body. It looked like a boa constrictor squeezing the life out of him. He face started to match the color of his hair.

I did feel bad for him, and scared. But I would be lying if I said I didn’t feel like he deserved it. I kind of wanted it to happen. And I’ll always feel bad for that, like somehow I made it happen in real life.

I was afraid to move, because I didn’t know if nature would attack me, too. So I sat. And I watched. And they didn’t make any noise – they never do – but I somehow just knew they were there, plotting and waiting for an opportunity. I looked up at the sky.

Vance couldn’t scream. He was being choked by the tree. I watched him prying at the branches with his big, strong arms, and then suddenly – he saw them, too. His eyes got huge. I could almost see blood in them. He stopped moving.

Just his eyes – that’s what I remember most. And then the most terrifying thing I’ve ever seen: The turkey hawks came, one after another, flying into his face. They came back again and again, pecking him all over his body. There must’ve been 20 of them.

I couldn’t scream. I couldn’t breathe.

A brigade of red fox appeared and stood like an audience, doing nothing but watch the droppings of fresh pieces of flesh on the ground.

Seth showed up in the far corner of the lot, just walking casually. He had no idea what was going on. I wanted to holler to him to run away, but was too scared.

I heard a rustle – a loud one. And I saw Seth turn around. And then, I saw him running, with his head still turned backward.

A stampede of deer followed, their eyes glowing. The wind got so fierce I had to grab onto my costume at the sides and had all I could do to keep it over me. Piles of leaves whipped up, and they – they formed, like, baseballs, and the baseballs of leaves hit one after the other, pounding Seth in the head.

He fell to the ground. I saw him lie there on his stomach and, for a minute, the baseball leaves stopped. And the herd stopped behind him. He managed to wrench himself up on his elbows, and he looked like some dude who did too many push-ups in boot camp. But when he lifted his head, I saw that terror again – in the eyes. And then I looked where he was looking, and I saw them. The wild turkeys were lined up like an executioner squad.

I swear it’s true. And I wish I could get rid of that in my mind. I don’t want to say what came next.

No, they didn’t peck him like I thought they would. They walked to him, like, hopped, but very quickly, and they used their beaks to grab onto his shirt with patches. They dragged him. It was fast. They pulled him about . . . maybe the length of my neighbor’s ranch house into the swamp. But they didn’t just let him sink. Turtles crawled on top of him, and they pushed him down under the water. He fought it. I saw it. But there were a handful of turtles, then as many as a batch of cookies, and then I swear there were hundreds of turtles, like bees swarming a hive.

Campbell’s truck pulled in. He had a girl with him. She was about my age. His daughter, I guess. She was a little taller than me and had long, brown hair. I’d seen her around school, but didn’t really know her. I never talked to her. She was new.

I was so worried.

They started walking. I heard her telling her dad she needed to get some fall leaves for a project we’re doing at school. She took off from her dad and started coming my way. I had to do something.

“Hey!” I called, but didn’t yell. It was more like a loud whisper.

She didn’t hear me.

The coyotes never come out during daytime. But there they were, hiding in the trees right in front of her dad, who was pretty far away from us by now.

But she was right next to me.

I stood up, and she jumped back. I broke cover to show her my face, and then before she could say anything, I draped the costume over her head and crouched back down, pulling her with me.

Now, we were both under it. I knew she was about to scream, so I put both my hands over her mouth. It was the third look of wild eyes I’d see. But as she turned to look at me, us squatting on the ground under cover of homemade Halloween costume, she saw Vance. And she was quiet, but tears fell onto my hands. I released them.

Her head slumped down as if she felt helpless. It was because we saw her dad that moment. The coyotes – they – well, I don’t want to say what they did. But it was fast. It was fast, because as they gorged on him, tree branches shot down like lightning bolts, pinning each of his arms and legs. Snakes wrapped around his hands and feet, binding him to the ground. There were screams, but they lasted a lot shorter in real life than they do in my head.

The girl was not crying loudly, but whimpering. I was too shocked to make a sound.

And then, as we sat, whimpering and silent, shaking in fear, we heard a moan coming from Vance.

“What is he saying?” I whispered, but not to her. “What is he saying?” I repeated. I turned to her, and she was listening, too.

I heard it. It was clear this time.

“Forgive me, Mother Nature.”

The limbs released Vance. He slumped to the ground, but still alive.

The wind stopped. Something pulled at our cover. We were terrified. It pulled so fiercely, we tried to hang on, but couldn’t. The ghillie suit was dragged right off us. And there was the fourth pair of wide eyes I’d see that day. But they didn’t show fear. I knew those eyes. I knew that deer, but she was bigger. It was the fawn I’d protected in my yard so her mother could go find food.

Her mouth flicked down quickly at me, but I wasn’t afraid. She licked my arm.

 

 

 


Also published on Medium.

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6 thoughts on “Forgive Me, Mother Nature

  1. Very cool!!! How often we might have wished Mother Nature would fight back when humans encroach too much on wilderness, where are the wild things supposed to go?
    I really loved it!!!

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